Pursuing Greatness in Every Arena of Your Life

Robert Terson

I had a conversation with a young software salesperson from the Bay area in California. At the ripe old age of 23, I’d say Dylan is far ahead of most of his peers. He’s hungry for knowledge, because he wants to be a top producer, one of the great ones. I could hear the hunger in his voice as he asked question after question. We talked for an hour and twenty minutes, Dylan taking notes every step of the way, as I responded to his questions, recommended books, made suggestion after suggestion as to how he should approach the sales process. Admittedly, I can get on a roll during these conversations—there’s a lot to talk about. I think it’s fair to say this young man had a whole new perspective about his selling career, about life in general, when we hung up.

As is usually the case with my conversations with the salespeople who reach out to me, we talked about a lot more than selling. That surprised Dylan, but it shouldn’t have. Business is only one segment of a well-rounded, successful life. I told him that if he wanted to attain greatness, he needed to pay attention to all the segments of his life: husband, father, friend, neighbor, son, and so forth. I told him that it wouldn’t mean a thing if he became the greatest salesperson who ever existed, if these other aspects of his life weren’t just as important to him, just as fulfilling.

And now I’m telling that to you. Pay attention, my friends. Making a great living may be motivating you stop by this site, but there’s a lot more to life than [meaningful] work. Are you married? Do you love the person you’re married to? Do you find a way every day of your life together to tangibly show her/him how much she/he means to you? Are you a parent? Do you give as much of yourself to your children, as you do to your career? What about your friends and neighbors? Is your friendship an invaluable gift, or is the friendship you offer a thin veneer of what it could be, only skin deep?

If you take a good look at the people you admire the most, chances are excellent that they’ll be just as great in their relationships, as they are in their careers. Just as they work hard at their careers, they work hard at their relationships. They know you can’t attain greatness—the kind of special, all-around greatness I’m talking about—unless the people in your life are well cared for.

I’m sure you’ve heard over and over again that people on their deathbeds don’t say a word about having regret for not working more. No, it’s the people in their lives that their regrets focus on. Does that tell you anything?

I hope so!

 

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